This is BX @ Boxden.com


Oct 27 - Mexican Drug Cartels entrenched in 270 U.S. cities


 Oct 27 - Mexican Drug Cartels entrenched in 270 U.S. cities
topic by Screwhead - 10-27-2010, 04:29 PM - Boxden > BX Daily Bugle - news and headlines


MIAMI — For most Americans it is likely hard to understand the level of brutality consuming many regions in Mexico now as vicious drug-trafficking cartels f!ght with each other and the authorities over smuggling routes to the United States and distribution rights in Mexican neighborhoods. The bulk of this murd3rous conflict occurs just south of the 2,000-mile-long U.S. border, so close-by that bullets from gunfire in Mexico have struck buildings on the American side of the fence.

In the nearly four years since Mexican President Felipe Calderon, firmly supported by the U.S. government, launched an unprecedented attack on Mexico's drug kingpins, nearly 30,000 people have been k!lled. The victims include thousands of police officers, soldiers, public officials, judges and journalists, as the traffickers f!ght back with powerful weapons, many of them purchased in the United States. Often Mexican police find themselves outmanned and outgunned by the criminals.

Terrified Mexican officials have fled across the border seeking political asylum and some Mexican villages have become ghost towns after traffickers k!lled or pushed out the residents to clear the way for their smuggling operations.

The Mexican trafficking organizations have also crossed deeply into the United States, peddling tons of marijuana, methamphetamine, heroin and cocaine to American drug users, who reward the cartels with an estimated 19 to 39 billion dollars a year, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Federal authorities say Mexican traffickers are now entrenched in at least 270 American cities, running sophisticated and disciplined networks that not only bring the drugs in, but also ship truckloads of cash back to Mexico.

"Mexico and its government are looking at transnational drug trafficking as a national security threat. We, too, have to look at it seriously in our country," said David Gaddis, the DEA's chief for global enforcement operations. "It is our country's number one organized crime threat."

Making al-Qaida ‘look tame’

A distinguishing feature of the Mexican drug war is the unspeakable violence played out daily on the streets and posted in graphic detail by newspapers and media websites. Large-scale gun battles, mass executions, corpses strewn in public, behe@dings, torture and grenade attacks have become commonplace. As of this writing, at least a dozen Mexican mayors have been k!lled in 2010 alone. A gubernatorial candidate was shot dead on a highway. After a Mexican marine was k!lled during a raid against a drug kingpin, gunmen massacred the young man's family after his funeral.

"I think they make al-Qaida look tame in terms of what they do. I can't explain how someone loses their humanity and resorts to these things," said Anthony Coulson, a recently retired DEA supervisor. Coulson ran the DEA's Tucson District Office, overseeing 255 miles of border between the U.S. and Mexico. He argued that the violence, and the amounts of illicit drugs flowing from Mexico into the United States, has never been higher and that the traffickers have never been more powerful or in control of more territory than they are now.

"It's getting worse. I've never seen it at this level before," said Coulson.

Of particular concern is Ciudad Juarez, Mexico's fourth largest city with a population of 1.3 million people sitting right across the border from El Paso, Texas. Two major drug cartels and local gangs have been engaged in a vicious battle there over turf and smuggling routes. Last year alone, 2,800 people were k!lled there and the de@th toll this year could be higher. In two separate incidents within one week this October, gunmen stormed private parties in Juarez homes and opened fire.

In the first massacre, nine were k!lled. In the second, thirteen — ranging in age from 16 to 25 years old — died when gunmen stormed a birthday party and started shooting. The attackers escaped, but authorities suspect the rampage is somehow connected to the ongoing turf war over drugs. Several other mass k!llings have occurred in drug rehabilitation facilities.

Adding to the terror in Juarez, a remote-controlled car b0mb aimed at police was detonated in the downtown area, k!lling three people and raising concerns over a heightened level of violence. To lure police to the scene, the b0mbers shot a man, dressed him in a police uniform, laid him on a street corner and then made an emergency call reporting an officer down. When responders arrived, the b0mb hidden in a brief case exploded.

A two-nation threat

Political and law enforcement leaders in both countries agree that American drug users fuel the Mexican trafficking cartels by purchasing their illicit products. They insist that demand reduction is an important component for calming the violence. There also are arguments about whether drug legalization would help, although the predominant view is both countries is that such measures are unlikely to be implemented on a national scale.

Another debate is over who is over who is actually winning the f!ght between the Mexican government and the drug traffickers.

"I don't think it's a winnable war," said Tony Payan, a drug cartel expert who teaches at the University of Texas at El Paso. "The reason I don't think it's winnable is that the United States is not addressing the consumption part. It's not doing its part to reduce the market itself."

David Gaddis, of the DEA, agrees than demand reduction is crucial, but he also points to recent arrests of major traffickers, large drug seizures and increase cooperation and intelligence sharing between Mexican and U.S. authorities. He argued that the extreme violence is the result of traffickers being threatened and cut off from their normal smuggling activities by the Mexican police and military.

"I see it as very positive, despite the violence that's ongoing throughout Mexico," Gaddis said.

"Desperation results in desperate acts, such as the brutality and the massacres that are ongoing. So we would expect to see continued violence for some time. But at some point, it will yield."

Others fear that Mexico is now in a long-term spiral toward more bloodshed as the brazen traffickers lash out and f!ght for control. Mexico's next presidential election in 2012, they say, is critical, because it will determine whether the current level of pressure on the cartels will continue past President Calderon's administration.

Jose Reyes Ferriz, who just completed a term as mayor of Juarez, insists the United States must fully understand that the current drug war deeply affects both sides of the border and should do more to help. "The same gangs that are in Mexico are the same gangs that distribute drugs in the United States," he said. "It is a joint problem, and (solving) the problems of Mexico prevents the problem from jumping to the United States."


Drug ‘war next door’ linked directly to U.S. - World news - Americas - Focus on Mexico - msnbc.com


Latest News Hot Topics »   share this topic »   Share this on Twitter Share this on Facebook

19 comments for "Oct 27 - Mexican Drug Cartels entrenched in 270 U.S. cities"


 10-27-2010, 04:38 PMonline - #2
CentsCuZ 18 heat pts18

  d 
space
$10,606 | POWERFUL
And legalization would end it all overnight.
 10-27-2010, 05:26 PMaway - #3
TYT 15 heat pts15

  d 
space
$3,367 | 13400110
uhhh.... this is NEWS? where you been??
 10-27-2010, 05:33 PMaway - #4
DERRTY CHYBO 7 heat pts

  d 
space
$9,777 | POWERFUL
Originally Posted by CentsCuZ
And legalization would end it all overnight.

 10-27-2010, 05:51 PMaway - #5
Chief Dee 6 heat pts

  d 
space
$10,198 | POWERFUL
Mexican Cartels are not a violent threat in America except for border towns. I mean atleast in Chicago, cuz all they really do here is distribute. The Mexican Cartel gangs arent actually out here standing on the corner shooting at people and k!lling dudes. It's the actual gangs in Chicago that do all of this shyt while they just buy from the Cartel. The cartels dont control blocks, run hoods, get involved in the street wars, etc or none of that here. So before I worry about Mexicans, I'd be more worried about my own local street gang.

Last edited by Chief Dee; 10-27-2010 at 05:53 PM..
 10-27-2010, 06:21 PMaway - #6
Screwhead|m 172 heat pts172

  d 
space
$14,748 | POWERFUL
Originally Posted by Chief Dee
Mexican Cartels are not a violent threat in America except for border towns.
There are border towns in the U.S. as well, you know.


Originally Posted by Chief Dee
I mean atleast in Chicago, cuz all they really do here is distribute. The Mexican Cartel gangs arent actually out here standing on the corner shooting at people and k!lling dudes.
The U.S. Border Patrol would say different.


Originally Posted by Chief Dee
It's the actual gangs in Chicago that do all of this shyt while they just buy from the Cartel. The cartels dont control blocks, run hoods, get involved in the street wars, etc or none of that here. So before I worry about Mexicans, I'd be more worried about my own local street gang.
They are the money men behind the people who "control the blocks" which means they hold tremendous influence on those blocks.

They supply the dealers (and many suppliers), and will get them k!lled when they don't recoup.

Those holding the most power are ALWAYS the ones behind the scenes.
 10-27-2010, 06:30 PMaway - #7
USC 72 heat pts72

  d 
space
$15,426 | POWERFUL
I would bet their are more city's than that honestly
 10-27-2010, 07:29 PMaway - #8
Old Man Quillis 14 heat pts14

  d 
space
$21,486 | POWERFUL
Originally Posted by Beaker
are you ####ing stupid?

you really think legalization would end it?


not that legalization might not be a good option, but to think that it would end drug cartels is just ridiculous
The only thing that will change about the cartels if "Legalization" happens is the Skin tone of the cartels.
 10-27-2010, 07:38 PMonline - #9
CentsCuZ 18 heat pts18

  d 
space
$10,606 | POWERFUL
A war isn't being fought in Mexico over cigarettes or liquor. 26,000 people haven't died in Mexico, since 2006, due to the cartels trying to get wine or chewing tobacco into the United States.

It's a fact, prohibition fattens the pockets of organized crime.

Legalize it, tax it, regulate it, and overnight the Cartels lose their only noteworthy source of revenue. Overnight they lose their funding for the war. Overnight they even lose their motivation for a war (supply route control).
 10-27-2010, 08:27 PMaway - #10
MosDefinition 7 heat pts

  d 
space
$16,555 | POWERFUL
Originally Posted by CentsCuZ
A war isn't being fought in Mexico over cigarettes or liquor. 26,000 people haven't died in Mexico, since 2006, due to the cartels trying to get wine or chewing tobacco into the United States.

It's a fact, prohibition fattens the pockets of organized crime.

Legalize it, tax it, regulate it, and overnight the Cartels lose their only noteworthy source of revenue. Overnight they lose their funding for the war. Overnight they even lose their motivation for a war (supply route control).
this has turned into a national security issue now so there isnt a chance in hell its legalized

do u think these cartel are going to disappear they have a larger combined force then the entire mexican army and they are better equipped
 10-27-2010, 10:56 PMaway - #11
juny 15 heat pts15

  d 
space
$2,429 | POWERFUL
legalizing wouldnt end it but at least all that money going down south can stay in the usa less money for them since we cultivating it here also jobs would be created.yes eveyone will be trying to get high didnt the same #### happened with alcohol and look at it now.plus not legalizing it would be bad with all the money loss sinnce peole can get over the counter meds now a dayz u get high with anything so y not take advantage lol
 10-27-2010, 10:58 PMaway - #12
juny 15 heat pts15

  d 
space
$2,429 | POWERFUL
people look at it like a bad thing now but when all that money come in everyone will forget about it just make strong laws like liquor
 10-28-2010, 06:04 AMonline - #13
CentsCuZ 18 heat pts18

  d 
space
$10,606 | POWERFUL
It's funny that people keep saying how dumb other people are for saying legalization would end the wars in Mexico. Meanwhile, the idiots that are calling other people dumb fail to mention any support for their paper-thin argument(s). In case you didn't know, that's called an ad hominem. You're attacking the man who made the argument rather than the argument itself. It's a sign of weakness.

As for decriminalization being such a bad thing, feel free to check out the following article talking about Portugal's success with decriminalization. Notice, I provide support for my argument while the others just call people "dumb a$ses." Never mind the fact that the guy is stupid enough to believe that "Cowboys run the NFL." That alone should tell you the guy is retarded.

Pop quiz: Which European country has the most liberal drug laws? (Hint: It's not the Netherlands.)

Although its capital is notorious among stoners and college kids for marijuana haze–filled "coffee shops," Holland has never actually legalized cannabis — the Dutch simply don't enforce their laws against the shops. The correct answer is Portugal, which in 2001 became the first European country to officially abolish all criminal penalties for personal possession of drugs, including marijuana, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine.

At the recommendation of a national commission charged with addressing Portugal's drug problem, jail time was replaced with the offer of therapy. The argument was that the fear of prison drives addicts underground and that incarceration is more expensive than treatment — so why not give drug addicts health services instead? Under Portugal's new regime, people found guilty of possessing small amounts of drugs are sent to a panel consisting of a psychologist, social worker and legal adviser for appropriate treatment (which may be refused without criminal punishment), instead of jail.

The question is, does the new policy work? At the time, critics in the poor, socially conservative and largely Catholic nation said decriminalizing drug possession would open the country to "drug tourists" and exacerbate Portugal's drug problem; the country had some of the highest levels of hard-drug use in Europe. But the recently released results of a report commissioned by the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank, suggest otherwise.

The paper, published by Cato in April, found that in the five years after personal possession was decriminalized, illegal drug use among teens in Portugal declined and rates of new HIV infections caused by sharing of dirty needles dropped, while the number of people seeking treatment for drug addiction more than doubled.

"Judging by every metric, decriminalization in Portugal has been a resounding success," says Glenn Greenwald, an attorney, author and fluent Portuguese speaker, who conducted the research. "It has enabled the Portuguese government to manage and control the drug problem far better than virtually every other Western country does."

Compared to the European Union and the U.S., Portugal's drug use numbers are impressive. Following decriminalization, Portugal had the lowest rate of lifetime marijuana use in people over 15 in the E.U.: 10%. The most comparable figure in America is in people over 12: 39.8%. Proportionally, more Americans have used cocaine than Portuguese have used marijuana.

The Cato paper reports that between 2001 and 2006 in Portugal, rates of lifetime use of any illegal drug among seventh through ninth graders fell from 14.1% to 10.6%; drug use in older teens also declined. Lifetime heroin use among 16-to-18-year-olds fell from 2.5% to 1.8% (although there was a slight increase in marijuana use in that age group). New HIV infections in drug users fell by 17% between 1999 and 2003, and de@ths related to heroin and similar drugs were cut by more than half. In addition, the number of people on methadone and buprenorphine treatment for drug addiction rose to 14,877 from 6,040, after decriminalization, and money saved on enforcement allowed for increased funding of drug-free treatment as well.

Portugal's case study is of some interest to lawmakers in the U.S., confronted now with the violent overflow of escalating drug gang wars in Mexico. The U.S. has long championed a hard-line drug policy, supporting only international agreements that enforce drug prohibition and imposing on its citizens some of the world's harshest penalties for drug possession and sales. Yet America has the highest rates of cocaine and marijuana use in the world, and while most of the E.U. (including Holland) has more liberal drug laws than the U.S., it also has less drug use.

"I think we can learn that we should stop being reflexively opposed when someone else does [decriminalize] and should take seriously the possibility that anti-user enforcement isn't having much influence on our drug consumption," says Mark Kleiman, author of the forthcoming When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment and director of the drug policy analysis program at UCLA. Kleiman does not consider Portugal a realistic model for the U.S., however, because of differences in size and culture between the two countries.

But there is a movement afoot in the U.S., in the legislatures of New York State, California and Massachusetts, to reconsider our overly punitive drug laws. Recently, Senators Jim Webb and Arlen Specter proposed that Congress create a national commission, not unlike Portugal's, to deal with prison reform and overhaul drug-sentencing policy. As Webb noted, the U.S. is home to 5% of the global population but 25% of its prisoners.

At the Cato Institute in early April, Greenwald contended that a major problem with most American drug policy debate is that it's based on "speculation and fear mongering," rather than empirical evidence on the effects of more lenient drug policies. In Portugal, the effect was to neutralize what had become the country's number one public health problem, he says.

"The impact in the life of families and our society is much lower than it was before decriminalization," says Joao Castel-Branco Goulao, Portugual's "drug czar" and president of the Institute on Drugs and Drug Addiction, adding that police are now able to re-focus on tracking much higher level dealers and larger quantities of drugs.

Peter Reuter, a professor of criminology and public policy at the University of Maryland, like Kleiman, is skeptical. He conceded in a presentation at the Cato Institute that "it's fair to say that decriminalization in Portugal has met its central goal. Drug use did not rise." However, he notes that Portugal is a small country and that the cyclical nature of drug epidemics — which tends to occur no matter what policies are in place — may account for the declines in heroin use and de@ths.

The Cato report's author, Greenwald, hews to the first point: that the data shows that decriminalization does not result in increased drug use. Since that is what concerns the public and policymakers most about decriminalization, he says, "that is the central concession that will transform the debate."
 10-28-2010, 07:10 AMaway - #14
SmokeyTheBlunt 4 heat pts

  d 
space
$12,869 | POWERFUL
legalizing drugs would most certainly help but not erase the problem. it would at least stop it momentarily. but who knows later down the line what they would do to generate income? it could get alot worse. drug wise its been nuts since they showed up here and idk if i want to see such ruthless people lose millions/billions if we did do something like legalizing certain drugs. i dont want gang members with military training with zero regard for human life doing something like pulling kick doors to get paid
 10-28-2010, 07:53 AMaway - #15
theking1 2 heat pts

  d 
space
$5,945 | 9979020
cartels>>>>>>
 10-28-2010, 08:01 AMaway - #16
DERRTY CHYBO 7 heat pts

  d 
space
$9,777 | POWERFUL
How can some of you argue that legalization would HELP the cartels? The main reason why they exist in the first place is because of the illegality of certain drugs. I'm pretty sure these guys aren't importing liquor and cigs. Use common ####ing sense.
 
 


Go Back   Boxden.Com - Stay First. Follow BX. > BX Table Of Contents > BX Daily Bugle - news and headlines
    
         

 



Latest hot topics on fire the past 48 hrs
Image inside  Aug 22 - Pimpstagram: Sex Trafficker Left Photo Trail
55 comments
Image inside  Aug 22 - Sixth-Grade Teacher Charged With Rape Of 13-..
74 comments
NFL 2ND Annual BXSC NFL Pick Em Challenge Week 1 Picks!!!!!
164 comments
 NFL Nfl Rookie Mike Evans -- Insane Nightclub Brawl ... Th...
New reply 1 minute ago - 161 comments - by Dray
 NBA *godly* Kobe Hits 6 Game Winners In 1 Season 2009-2010...
New reply 21 minutes ago - 75 comments - by lefthookright
 Video inside The Breakfast Club Ethers Floyd Mayweather As He Strug...
New reply 8 minutes ago - 425 comments - by MajorD
 BOX New Floyd Mayweather Gifs!
New reply 23 minutes ago - 106 comments - by PotheadFocker
  But Wait, There's More! Sprint Unveils New $60 Unlimit...
New reply 11 minutes ago - 111 comments - by Jago
 Image(s) inside Biggie’s Son Denies He’s Gay, Hints That He "gets...
New reply 28 minutes ago - 104 comments - by Avon_Barksdale
 Video inside Soulja Boy Message To Gillie Da Kid "knock You Ou...
New reply 18 minutes ago - 92 comments - by akverse47
 Image(s) inside Cute Freckles.. Thim Slick Yalla Badd Bi-ch Alyssa Mar...
New reply 32 minutes ago - 54 comments - by Muunsta

Like BX on Facebook Follow BX on Twitter
5,766 fans of BX | none new today 4,746 following | none new today

hot topic blog   »    hip-hop   |   sports   |   movies   |   games   |   news   |   wild'ish   |   gear   |   rides   |   tech

contact us   |   mobile   |   privacy statement

© Boxden.com. 1998 - end of time.